Eli Block
Internal Portfolio
September 2020

I'm a graphic, product, interaction, and industrial designer at Google Brand Studio in San Francisco, California. I'm also a member of the Google Brand Studio data strategy team in partnership with Google Trends and Google News Lab. The data strategy team mines insights from Google Search data to support creative work from campaigns (e.g. The Most Searched) to social (e.g. Breaking Good Trends) to Year in Search (e.g. Year in Search 2019). I'm currently straddling the visual design, UX, and content strategy teams on a redesign of Google Trends.

My work often spans multiple areas of design. Before joining Google Brand Studio, I worked across teams at Google Creative Lab in New York City. In July of 2018, I graduated from the Google Creative Lab's Creative 5 program, which awards 5 year-long creative residency positions to promising young designers, technologists, and writers.

I'm originally from Santa Cruz, California and attended high school in Monterey. In June of 2017, I graduated with honors from the Brown University & Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) Dual Degree Program with degrees in evolutionary biology & industrial design and a concentration in Nature, Culture, and Sustainability Studies. While at RISD, I was the longest serving member of the RISD Design Guild, a student-run graphic design firm. In my final year at school, I served as the Design Guild's manager, supporting and overseeing the freelance work of 8 other student designers. Following graduation in the summer of 2017, I was selected from more than 2,500 applicants to be a KPCB Design Fellow at Helix—a direct-to-consumer genetic testing startup. Overall, I'm interested in bright color, strange texture, inventive form, emerging technologies, social and environmental justice, pop culture, and creative strategy.

During my past 3 years at Google, I've worked on everything from websites to hardware to UX to strategy to type design, posters and identities, furniture, print design & more. I've worked on videos with 150M+ views and web fonts with 1B+ loads. Moving forward, I'm looking for opportunities in the product design, interaction design, strategy, industrial design, and CMF spaces.

You can find my resume here—or reach out to eliblock@google.com or eli.block@me.com with any questions.

Project Directory
2018 — 2020

All of the work featured here was done in the last 24 months—both inside and outside of Google Creative Lab and Google Brand Studio. However, I've also worked on a ton of projects that aren't featured here, like the Experiments Platform Exhibitions at Google I/O 2018 and 2019, simple DIY voice-activated machines (Paper Signals), Google's messaging strategy, a campaign for Google Assistant, a redesign of Google Shopping, the relaunch of "Our Stories" on About.google, the Google Company OKR's website, and features for Google Pixel 4.

Front view of marbled Fossil drive angled slightly to the right.

Fossil
Long-term file storage drive
2019 — 2020

Miu
Font family
2020

Google Trends
Google product redesign
2019 — 2020

Compton Cowboys
Google Trends editorial
2020

Soli Objects
Hardware Exploration
2019

Google COVID-19 Site
COVID-19 Information & Resources
2020

YouTube Learning Prize
Design for YouTube Learning Prize
2017 — 2018

Most Searched in History
Interactive campaign website
2019 — 2020

Year in Search
Interactive campaign website
2019

Year in Search
Additional interactive concepts
2019

Type I
Wild-Type Color
2017 — 2018

Type II & Type III
Wild-Type Color
2017 — 2018

Google Pixel 6 Website
Google hardware vision
2018 — 2019

Type IV
Wild-Type Solar
2017 — 2018

Pattern Radio: Whale Songs
Interactive website design
2018 — 2019

Type L
Wild-Type Landscape
2017 — 2018

Type T
Wild-Type Landscape
2017 — 2018

Type K
Wild-Type Landscape
2017 — 2018

Type S
Wild-Type Landscape
2017 — 2018

Paradiso Poster
Wild-Type poster
2020

Fossil Poster
Wild-Type Fossil promotion poster
2019

Type P
Wild-Type Landscape
2020

Google Search History
Design for Google Chrome feature
2019

Phone Mode
Power-saving light mode for Google Pixel 4
2019

Notable Women
Google font, brand, website, apps
2017 — 2018

Lacquer
Google font, website, posters
2019

Modern Art Google Home
Hardware & exhibition concept
2017 — 2018

Google Crabfood
Internal insight team brand & website
2017 — 2018

Google Crabfood Culture
Bi-weekly culture newsletter
2017 — 2018

Creative Lab 5
Website for Google Creative Lab 5
2017 — 2018

ADCOLOR + Google Hackathon
Misc. branding and posters
2018

#Ad
Shopping experience visioning
2018

Process work
2018 — 2020

Any professional creative knows that compiling your portfolio can be a daunting task—especially when considering yet unlaunched work in the production pipeline and sensitive work that must be protected under non-disclosure agreement. There is also, however, always more work to show that is still in development or not quite finished.

Like other creatives, I have a ton of process work and in-production projects. For this reason, process concepts in this portfolio are called out with tan text and some additional process images are included at the very bottom of this page. That said, I'm happy to share more process work related to any project documented here—just let me know what you're interested in seeing.

Lastly, to distinguish process work images visually from finished work on this site, they are framed and presented in black and white, as below.

An application sketch for Miu, a san serif typeface developed outside of Google Brand Studio. I've drawn over 250 glyphs for Miu in the last few months.

Fossil
Long-term file storage drive
2019 — 2020

Fossil is a collection of file storage drives for the far future. F20 (pictured below) is a portless synthetic stone smartphone-sized monolith for storing 20 of your most precious files. The F20 Fossil drive was designed to store a limited number of files, forcing its user to decide what is most precious to them and what they'd like to store for decades or centuries. In our age of endless information and infinite cloud storage, Fossil asks what digital information you find essential, and what you might want to hold onto or pass down as a physical/digital heirloom in the future.

While only one concept is presented here, Fossil is intended to be a collection of file storage objects—ranging from a single-file-storing charm to the monolith below for 20 files to an amphora-like vessel for hundreds of files. See Fossil process work here.

Front view of marbled Fossil drive angled slightly to the right.

The F20 Fossil drive was produced by casting colored resin into a single layered block (the texture of which references the lithostratigraphy of ancient geological sediments). The block was then refined, sanded, scanned, retouched and finally used to texture the 3D model presented above.

The Fossil collection is about materiality more than anything else, concreting digital information into a recognizable raw material (the cast rock-like resin) that then becomes synonymous with information storage (much the way layers of rock in the Earth's crust contain information about the past).

Back view of marbled Fossil drive angled slightly to the right.

The entire exterior of the drive is composed of one material, etched with a few simple graphics that describe its use. For production, a single block of material is milled hollow and fitted with a custom flash drive. The single milled hole in the device is then capped with another piece of similarly cast resin, resulting in a water-tight file storage drive. Files on the device are accessed via Bluetooth when the subtly-concave bottom side of the device is placed onto a subtly convex crushed-velvet-covered doc (in development).

See the bottom of this page for some additional information about this project, process images, and concept sketches.

Design, concept development, formal development, 3D modeling, preliminary rendering, and creative direction by me; 3D art and final rendering by Fahredin Kosumi.

Miu
Font family
2020

Miu is a san serif typeface developed outside of Google Brand Studio. Miu currently has a complete Latin glyph set containing 250+ glyphs. I'm currently working on light, bold, and stencil weights of Miu to be used in upcoming projects.

Because Miu is still in development, you can see additional process images, sketches, etc. in the process work section at the bottom of this page.

Above is an application sketch for the first finished weight of Miu. The font is geometric and relatively evenly weighted. The font's primary distinguishing characteristic is its small pixel-like ink traps.

Below: the redesign of the Wild-Type logo. The development of Miu began when I set out to draw a custom logotype for Wild-Type—a hardware experiments brand I use frequently for independent projects. The original Wild-Type logo was set in Neue Haas Grotesk Display; Miu takes many design queues from Neue Haas, Helvetica, and Neuzeit—three of my favorite typefaces.

The redrawn Wild-Type logo is lighter and more narrow. The letters are finely spaced and the rectangular twiddle of the original 'i' is replaced with a round form.

In just a few weeks, I drew a complete Latin glyph set for Miu. While some glyphs are still being altered as I continue to draw additional weights, the majority of the forms are near completion.

Below, a few of the glyphs I most enjoyed drawing.

Lastly, an application sketch for a rebrand of sustainable clothing brand Reformation using Miu (and an alternate 'a' glyph).

Again, this project is still in development, so check out the process work at the bottom of this page. If you'd like to try a demo version of Miu, please reach out to me at eliblock@google.com.

Compton Cowboys
Google Trends editorial design
2020

The Compton Cowboys are "A collective of lifelong friends on a mission to uplift their community through horseback and farming lifestyle, all the while highlighting the rich legacy of African-Americans in equine and western heritage."

Anytown is a Google Trends editorial series exploring trending searches from specific locations across the world. The first Anytown story is about the Compton Cowboys—who are being searched now more than ever before. The Compton Cowboys Anytown story was recently published on About.google and on YouTube. Month ago, I designed an alternative to the simple module-based design then in production in order to provide a vision for what a richer editorial experience could look like and to celebrate and honor an exceptional organization and group of people.

Because the primary source of traffic for this page is users referred from social media (who will have likely already watched a clip of the film and decided to see more), the editorial features the documentary film above the fold at the top of the page for easy access. In an effort to emphasize this story's importance and uniqueness, the entire page uses a dark theme and custom handwritten display type.

Subtle grid lines and guides structure the page throughout, while scratches, textures, and expressive handwritten type provide moments of contrast.

The editorial tells the story of the video, highlighting significant quotes from Keiara Wade and other members of the Compton Cowboys.

Because our user studies have shown that users unexposed to previews are trailers are most likely to watch films after they have already begun reading a story, I presented this alternative placement for the full documentary film halfway down the page.

The documentary film is beautifully shot. In designing this editorial, I focused on opportunities to highlight imagery while telling the story of Keiara, her family, and the rest of the Compton Cowboys.

The editorial ends with a call to action. Here, users have the option to donate directly to the Compton Cowboys to support their horse rescue and rehabilitation and social and community justice work.

Soli Objects
Hardware exploration
2019

At the beginning of June, Google Creative Lab did a sprint with the Google hardware team about applications for Soli—a near-field radar technology that can track gestures and other movements in its immediate surroundings. For this project, I developed three discrete pieces of Soli-enabled hardware (a wall tile, a tabletop pawn, and a wearable pebble) that respond to hand gestures to control devices (from lights to speakers to headphones and more) in a connected home.

The three Soli object designs I produced are differentiated by use case. The first is for use on a wall or similar vertical flat surface. It has a soft rubber adhesive backing and a hard ceramic exterior. This object might be used for turning on and off, dimming, or precisely controlling smart home devices typically controlled by wall interfaces, like lights.

To blend into the home environment, the design references a minimal wall tile. Rendered here in a simple brown ceramic, the tile could also come in other colors—either brighter to call attention to the device or more neutral to disappear into the room. While I opted to put the Google "Super G" hardware logo on the front of the tile for visibility in this render, a more discrete version might conceal branding altogether.

Above: rough spec sheet for scale of the wall tile Soli object. Below: swatches from color palette study for the wall tile Soli object.

The second Soli object class is for use on a table top or similar horizontal flat surface. It has a soft rubber bottom and a hard plastic or metal body. This object might be used as a portable mechanism for gesture controlling devices that are out of reach—like speakers, a tv, lights, etc.

In order not to be lost amongst the potential clutter of a workspace, desk, or table, the design is brightly colored and stands vertically at attention. The traffic-cone-like shape is topped with a graspable ball for ease of handling. The comfortable small shape is reminiscent of a chess pawn—an object with clear interaction affordances.

Above: rough spec sheet for scale of the pawn Soli object. Below: swatches from color palette study for the pawn Soli object.

The third Soli object is for carrying with you. It consists of a hard central disk and a modifiable exterior (here a rubber bumper). This object might be used as a portable mechanism for gesture controlling devices that are out of reach—including your phone, computer, car, headphones, etc.

While rendered here with a soft circular bumper (for ease of gripping, pulling in and out of a pocket, etc.), the exterior ring can be removed and replaced with other accessories like a lanyard or a watch band. This FAB and its accessories would ideally come in a range of styles and colors to allow for personalization.

Above: rough spec sheet for scale of the pebble Soli object. Below: swatches from color palette study for the pebble Soli object.

Design, concept development, formal development, 3D modeling, preliminary rendering, and creative direction by me; 3D art and final rendering by Fahredin Kosumi.

Google COVID-19 Site
COVID-19 Information & Resources
2020

At the beginning of March, as much of the United States began sheltering in place to flatten the infection curve of COVID-19, my team at Brand Studio sprinted to design, develop, and launch a microsite with coronavirus-related information and resources. The site design and structure I produced, after evolving through several rounds of revisions made by me and one other designer, ultimately went into production—resulting in Google.com/covid19.

As a member of the data strategy team, I also worked with the Google Trends and Google News Lab teams to identify the common searches related to coronavirus featured on the site.

The site is comprised of an information & insights page and a resources page. Much of the content on the information & insights page is surfaced when users search for "covid-19" on Google. The content of the resources page is aggregated from across the web and unique to the page, which is itself linked from search results related to coronavirus.

This site was designed by me (visual & interaction design) and my team at Brand Studio in just under one week. While we sprinted to get this site live, we continue to evolve it to serve people looking for credible coronavirus related information, insights, and resources on the web. Visit the live site at Google.com/covid19.

YouTube Learning Prize
Design for YouTube Learning Prize
2017 — 2018

Designed a simple trophy for the YouTube Learning Prize—an award given to top educational YouTube video creators. This project was part of a larger #YouTubeTaughtMe YouTube advertising campaign developed at Google Creative Lab and since passed to Brand Studio.

The design loosely references a rolled diploma from an institution of higher learning or a relay baton for the passing of knowledge. More whimsically, the award is a literal tube—referencing YouTube. The goal of this design was to create something iconic (and also comical) in its simplicity—like AIGA's Young Guns cube—with just enough gloss to communicate its prestige.

Above left: subtle color gradient used as reference for rendering the YouTube Learning Prize above. Above right: rough spec sheet for scale of the price. The tube was designed to be satisfying to grasp with one hand—like a relay baton.

Design, concept development, formal development, 3D modeling, preliminary rendering by me. Creative direction by Steve Rura; 3D art and final rendering by Fahredin Kosumi.

Most Searched in History
Interactive campaign website
2019 — 2020

In honor of Black History Month in 2020, Google is celebrating the icons and moments that have been searched more than any others in the United States.

The Most Searched campaign highlights Black American achievements that have captivated our attention over time, have had an undeniable influence on history, and are shaping our future. From Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” (the most searched speech in history) to Beyonce’s Homecoming (the most searched performance in history), Most Searched pays tribute to Black brilliance.

When I started at Brand Studio in June 2019, the in-development campaign featured a powerful film and out-of-home advertising concepts. I immediately recognized that Most Searched should also have a more permanent destination on the web. In August 2019, I designed and pitched a proposal for a Most Searched interactive editorial—where visitors could not only watch the campaign film, but also learn more about the people and events featured in it.

Ultimately, my essential interactive and experience design evolved into the Most Searched editorial as presented here, which includes contextual information about the history makers, insight into Google’s methodology for designating icons and moments Most Searched, and Google’s pledge to support the next generation of Black Americans.

It was an honor to have been able to contribute to this exceptional project. Visit the site at g.co/BlackHistoryMonth and learn something about someone who continues to leave us in awe, teach us something incredible, and make history. Really and truly, search on.

Cover screens for g.co/BlackHistoryMonth, the destination of the Most Searched campaign. After landing on a short description of the project, users are presented with a collection of Most Searched people and events. The images in the background scroll slowly by default. Hovering any of the images displays its associated most searched term. In the above example, the Rosa Parks and the pivotal role she played in Montgomery bus boycott is the most searched boycott of all time.

The next section of the site features a scrollable carousel of most searched terms. Clicking or scrolling to any term highlights it, displays an associated image, and reveals additional details about the person, place, or event that is, in fact, the most searched. Above, a still of the site displaying the most searched speech of all time: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream.”

On desktop, images are cropped to horizontal or vertical aspect ratios and alternately display aligned to the top left and right of the screen. Contextual information is consistently displayed on the bottom left. The most searched terms appear in a centered carousel.

Above: side by side comparison of the final editorial design (left) and the same screen from the first ever pitch materials (right).

In phase II of the build, individual reports will be readable on the site (userswill no longer need to be linked out to Google Docs). The above image shows what reading a report might look like.

The above two images represent inspiration for the overall design of the Most Searched editorial. Above left is a still from Solange’s takeover of Black Planet for her ablum When I Get Home. Above right is a design I produced during the preliminary design phase of 2019’s Google Year in Search interactive website. The Most Searched editorial uses an interaction paradigm I initially designed for a Year in Search editorial concept.

In its original form, the editorial had an emphasis on incorporating artifacts from Google products into the user experience. In the above example featuring Serena Williams (the most searched tennis player), the editorial displays a onebox containing her most significant recent match statistics.

In the above example featuring Barack Obama and Kehinde Wiley (the most searched portrait), contextual information about the significance of the portrait is paired with cameo-like videos of Barack Obama himself answering questions related to the painting.

In this final example of how the editorial could incorporate artifacts from Google products, Whitney Houston’s feature (the most searched anthem in history) is paired with a YouTube video of Houston singing the star-spangled banner.

Here’s to the history makers and the icons and moments that keep us searching. You can see the live site at g.co/BlackHistoryMonth.

Year in Search
Interactive campaign website
2019

Every December, Brand Studio produces the "Year in Search"—a supercut of the most searched moments of the year wrapped in a compelling narrative. The Year in Search interactive is intended to extend the Year in Search experience by highlighting and allowing users to explore the Google Trends data behind select moments and people featured in the film.

I was the principle interaction and visual designer for the Year in Search 2019 interactive experience. Below is a collection of designs for different incarnations of the interactive site. While many experiences were considered, the ultimate design allows users to watch the Year in Search video, and then to go "behind the scenes" to explore the things the world searched for in 2019. You can visit the live site at about.google. I also designed the Year in Search collection page on the Google About site, where you can see all the past Year in Search videos.

Ultimately, the Year in Search 2019 interactive companion site won the 2020 Best Branded Editorial Experience Webby for the "best individual and multi-part stories or editorial features enhanced by the addition of innovative storytelling elements, design components, and increased interactivity."

Above: styleframes for the Year in Search interactive experience introductory animation. Below: the Year in Search interactive experience landing. Before it was updated to remove direct access to the trends, users could click to watch the Year in Search video or jump directly into the Google Trends behind the film.

When the video plays, the site transitions to a darker theatre mode and the trends CTA below the video player changes to match the trend being displayed.

Stills of the interactive trend timeline accessible through the CTA underneath the video player. Clicking through to see a trend pauses and blurs the Year in Search video in the background. The timeline is clickable and scrollable. When scrolled, the moment that lands in the center of the viewport contextually expands to reveal additional information, including links to Google Trends and to Google search results for related queries.

The design featured several different paragraph formats, which were all pressure tested for translation and localization.

Mocks of the interactive trend timeline on mobile. I specially designed this format in order to work across screen sizes and interaction methods (i.e. scrolling versus horizontal swiping).

Top: various explorations for the interactive timeline CTA (either on top of the video as is standard for YouTube videos or beneath the video). Above: sample of other designs for the “trends cards” in the paused video state. Ultimately, I evolved these simpler cards into the timeline (below), which allowed for more trending moments to be visible at the same time.

An alternative design for a lightboxed version of the trends timeline. Here the moments from the film are shown on white—an aesthetic more closely associated with Google’s marketing.

The following designs are alternative versions of the Year in Search companion site that explore different interaction models. The designs immediately below are for an experience that pairs chapters from the video (on the left side of the screen) with trends insights (on the right side of the screen).

Styleframes for introductory type animation.

Styleframes for content load animations.

In this version of the interactive, the right side of the screen would scroll, animating in new content as the left side of the screen (the video, video stills, or looping video sections) remained stationary. As a new moment would load on, the type in the Google search bar on the left would type out the trending query.

This design also anticipated user interest in the trending moments and served relevant artifacts from Google search directly in the experience. In the example above, trend information about the film Bird Box is paired with the trailer for the movie.

A second example of how this scrolling experience might look and function. In this example, trend information about the first ever black hole image is paired with a link to the New York Times article in which the image was first announced.

Here, I also proposed developing a custom video player for the Year in Search so that we could hide elements from YouTube’s default embed that distract from the overall experience (i.e. pop-ups that suggest related videos, unnecessary logos, icons, and share UI that appears above and below the video, etc.). I also proposed building a custom scrubber that could snap to trend moments marked in the video and show previews in a small window about the video progress bar.

The above two designs explore incorporating color, Instagram-story-like chaptering, and different data visualization elements into the overall design.

Crucially, these designs serve artifacts from Google Search (i.e. the Game of Thrones Trailer), accommodating the behavior of users looking to learn more about the Year in Search film moments they're seeing.

Above: a final illustration of how Google product could be incorporated into the Year in Search interactive trends experience; here, both news and image search results relevant to the film moment appear on the right side of the screen.

Still more designs for a side-by-side trends model. Here, all the trends are visible in a list, which expands when the moment plays in the video. In this design, additional editorial information is compressed into each moment and the video scrubber has become a sequence of discretely chaptered moments.

An alternative approach to the Year in Search interactive that foregrounds editorial content about moments from the year. Users could learn about the relationships between various events and key search trends. In the above version, the complete Year in Search video would be presented at the top of the page, but could also be windowed to play in the corner of the browser as the user scrolls.

This and the following designs separate the video from the trends. The benefit of this approach is that users on all devices can watch the video uninterrupted and without missing any of the site contents. Additionally, these designs were successful when tested on users because they leverage the most essential and well understood behavior/interaction mechanism on the internet: scrolling. Here, clicking into any trend in the list reveals insights, graphs, and a brief editorial about how the subject relates to the broader theme of the year.

Sketch of a type-forward opening sequence for the Year in Search editorial direction of the interactive experience.

The above two stills represent a study for the editorial direction of the interactive experience where search queries (typed out within search bars) animate into images and accompanying trends data.

Additional explorations for the editorial direction of the Year in Search interactive experience. This direction highlights trends relative to each other—while still providing rich editorial content and the ability to watch the video as you explore.

Additional explorations for the editorial direction of the Year in Search interactive experience. This direction highlights trends relative to each other—while still providing rich editorial content and the ability to watch the video as you explore.

Finally, a version of the Year in Search interactive experience that maps trends data onto the 2019 calendar year. Users can click to see trends from many of the year's most significant days and events.

Needless to say, the selection of mocks shown here represent only a small slice of all the design (UI & UX) explorations for this project. In fact, in some ways this project is ongoing because I am continuing to make new designs relating video, editorial, and trends content for both the Google Trends redesign (under development) and the Year in Search 2020 interactive experience website.

Wild-Type Color
Industrial design concepts
2017 — 2018

Wild-Type is a platform for hardware experiments. Color is the first generation of devices; it's a collection of 3 smartphones: Type I, Type II, and Type III.

Wild-Type Color is designed with irreverence—supporting a diversity of shapes, sizes, colors, and capabilities. Optimized for operating system flexibility, privacy, augmented reality, and extended battery life among other things, the devices are an adventurous departure from design tradition.

These are just some of the images produced for this project. I sketched, drew in plan view, 3D modeled, spec'd the renders, and creative directed this project, which I completed outside of the workload I undertook at Creative Lab. More information about the project is available at wild-type.engineering/color.

Google Pixel 6 Website
Google hardware vision
2018 — 2019

Completed while working at Google Creative Lab, this project consists of visual and web design, industrial design, and creative direction for the future of Google’s Pixel phones.

Developed website sketches, phone design sketches (more below), and visual design principles to guide the development of Google Pixel 6, which will be released in 2021.

The design language I helped to develop for Pixel 6 focuses on highlighting the device’s humanity—reflecting how intimate our relationships with our personal devices will continue to be as Google leverages machine learning and artificial intelligence to make Pixel even more personal.

“Yours, truly.” became the guiding copyline for the project, driving creative direction towards communicating a personalized user experience. The team is working towards generative handwriting using machine learning.

Because books are very personal objects, I proposed delivering our design recommendations in book format. The designs displayed here are adapted from a concept book that never quite got approved.

These design principles reference the visuals of product features being developed for Pixel 6 itself.

Recommended using an unconventional visual storytelling method where sections of the site are devoted to imagery taken on device.

Recommended featuring the specific devices of the individuals in the site’s editorial photo-stories. These devices would be photographed and/or rendered to show wear—transforming the allure of the hyperreal technological object into a fetish of its use. The value of Pixel is in the unique differences of each object as it adapts to you and, in-turn, comes to visually reflect how you use it.

I'm still working on formatting and uploading more work from this project. Addition research and imagery forthcoming. If you'd to see more of this work, please let me know so I can add it to the front of my queue.

Pixel Vision 2021
Google hardware vision
2018 — 2019

Beginning in late August of 2018, I worked on strategy, positioning, product & feature development, and physical forms for the next 3–5 years of Google Pixel. Below are a few early stage sketches for Pixel devices with distinct conceptual focuses.

After transferring to Brand Studio, I no longer work directly on hardware like Pixel. However, more work from this and other past projects is available upon request.

Wild-Type Solar
Industrial design concepts
2017 — 2018

Wild-Type is a platform for hardware experiments. Solar is Wild-Type's second collection of experimental devices; a series of concept sketches for smartphones that are capable of operating fully off of the renewable energy generated by their own solar panels. Aspects of this project are still under development.

Wild-Type Solar is designed to be functional, sustainable, and beautiful. Both Type IV and Type V have a net zero carbon footprint and are made from recycled aluminum and the purest refined mineralogical components. Because both devices have an upgradable interior and durable exterior, you need never buy another smartphone again.

Type IV is designed to compete with other top-of-the-line smartphones; it has an OLED display and two rear-facing cameras. Type V comes in two variants. Both are designed to be low-cost, lightweight devices; variant one (pictured above) has an e-ink display and no cameras, while variant two has a split OLED/e-ink display and a single rear-facing camera.

More images for this project are forthcoming. Complementary liquid glass imagery taken by Qiu Yang.

Pattern Radio: Whale Songs
Interactive website design
2018 — 2019

Product/web design for a consumer-facing, interactive website that uses Google machine learning algorithms to classify 15,000 hours of National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration whale song recordings.

A stripped-down version of this experience was shown as part of the XXII Triennale di Milano themed Broken Nature: Design Takes on Human Survival.

I was responsible for the interaction design of the site. While the visual design of the launched site is considerably more brutalist then what I designed below, the essential functionality still matches many of the interactions I initially designed here (even if many other features of the experience were also removed to scale back the scope of the project). Even with a reduced feature scope, my work on Pattern Radio: Whale Songs won a Best Navigation/Structure Webby for "best-possible user experience through superior navigation and site structure."

Landing page map view of discrete recordings positioned where the recordings were made: at various sites around the Hawaiian islands in the Pacific Ocean.

The red play head is draggable and used for navigation. The clock icon allows users to browse the recordings aligned by the time they were made (see below).

Viewing the recordings aligned by the time they were made. The small blue tags indicate points of interests and are meant to serve as starting points for user exploration.

Zooming into a recording (using the plus and minus buttons in the bottom right [a Google Maps convention]) reveals additional points of interest (see below).

Colored bands on the recordings communicate sound classifications made by the machine learning models. A persistent timeline along the bottom of the recording communicates the scale of the data being viewed.

The tuning icon in the bottom left lets users turn on and off different machine learning classifiers—adding or removing colored bands from the recording.

Zooming in more reveals even more information about the whale song recordings, including units of whale vocalization (sometimes referred to as "whale phonemes"). Insights from scientists are peppered throughout the recordings, providing even more areas for users to investigate.

This design was completed as part of a UI/UX sprint for what ultimately evolved into Pattern Radio: Whale Songs.

Wild-Type Landscape
Industrial design concepts
2017 — 2018

Wild-Type is a platform for hardware experiments. Wild-Type Landscape is a desktop computer system—comprised of large 30" Type L screens, terrazzo-patterned displays, a Type K touch keyboard, and Type S modular strut pieces. Think build-your-own computer or DIY Google Jamboard.

Wild-Type Landscape is still under development; I'm currenltly working on models and renders for accompanying desktop computer cases. Also coming soon: a circular display and corresponding circular touch pad.

Wild-Type Landscape was featured in the January/February issue of Frame Magazine, themed "Out of Office."

Here, we showcase a device constructed from two Type L screens, a Type K touch keyboard, and an assortment of Type S pieces—yellow hinges and joints, multi-colored struts and screws, grey aluminum connecting plates, and a dozen colorful foam pads.

The intention for this system is that one would be able to use an online design tool to build your perfect Landscape machine—or even just pick out a few specific components to make the computer you already have something special.

Above and below are two of the many working files with color references for style and rendering. These documents were never intended to be final artifacts, just working process references.

Above and below are another two of my working design drawings for modular computer cases. The above orthographic is for a rectangular computer build and its case and the below drawing is for a cylindrical computer build and its case.

Wild-Type Landscape is designed to be dynamic. It's designed with the idea that, as tools, any two computers need not be alike—formally or functionally. And so the Landscape component system comes in over 20 different colors and supports an infinite number of configurations.

Images of terrazzo Type M and circular Type O will be added shortly along with more visuals of the OS and information about how interacting with the touch keyboard might work.

Posters
Experimental & promotional posters
2019 — 2020

Two recent posters I produced for independent design projects. The first is a poster for Fossil, a rock-like file storage drive collection I'm currently developing. I also designed and build a web-version of the Fossil poster, which I'm hoping to launch in a few months. The second poster is a purely visual remix of a classic Vogue Italia design.

Both posters were printed using a combination of techniques. The Fossil promotional poster was multi-pass blueprint printed while the Wild-Type x Vogue Italia poster was combination plotter and risogrpah printed.

Google Search History
Design for Google Chrome feature
2019

Sketches for a redesign of Google Chrome's history feature—making internet browsing history more visual, more organized, and easier to browse, search, and save. Self-initiated project at Google Creative Lab.

This project centers around converting Chrome's list of sites visited (dense, repetitive, difficult to parse visually) into a thread that traces an individual's path across the web.

Above, Google searches are replaced with more recognizable bars, YouTube videos are embedded for easy viewing, and common actions—like searching related topics, saving, annotating, and sharing—are associated with elements in a user's history.

Instead of simply showing a URL in browsing history, sites in threads would display visual previews—providing a more memorable experience.

All in all, this redesign of browsing history would specially treat commonly-visited sites (and provide unique support for Google-owned properties like Search, Images, Maps, etc.) like Vimeo and Instagram (among many), pulling out key site elements to create a visually compelling history of a user's time on the internet.

Google Shopping
Google product redesign
2018 — 2019

Shopping has long been one of Google's weakest product verticals. In an ongoing re-development and re-deployment of Google Shopping, I designed concepts for the future of shopping on Google while working at Google Creative Lab.

Note: this is not a complete set of images for the project—it is merely a sample of in-process work to illustrate my ability to design functional user interfaces, product flows, and full user experiences. The following collections of screens represent user shopping journeys on different platforms.

Worked across teams on the design for the product detail pages (PDP’s) that will launch as part of the next evolution of Google Shopping.

Product detail page in context. This high-information-density card allows users to get a sense of a product before seeing more information or adding it to their cart.

Design for a smaller, product card; additional information (discounts, proximity, and ads) is displayed across these 3 card variations as part of a consistent system.

Above four images: user flow for shopping through curated sets of images.

Above four images: user flow for finding and buying a product on Google and Google Shopping.

Above four images: user flow for using Google Lens (Google’s visual search tool) to find and buy products from screenshots (in this case a screenshot of Instagram).

Above four images: user flow for shopping through YouTube videos that feature buyable products (as indicated by tags on videos).

Again, this is just a selection of the many user flows and designs I produced while working on the future of Google Shopping across Google products.

Phone Mode
Power-saving light mode for Pixel
2019

Developed visual design for interface, product design for core functionality, and interaction design for user experience of an ultra-power-saving "phone-only" mode set to be built for Pixel. Phone Mode allows people to intentionally restrict the capabilities of their Pixel to calling and messaging, thereby enhancing digital wellbeing while simultaneously greatly extending device battery life (potentially up to 7 days).

Above: the new Phone Mode standby screen, which displays the dialer when unlocked. Tapping at the bottom brings the user to messages. The Phone Mode interface is extremely minimal (and black and white) overall in order to conserve device battery life.

Tapping “Messages” on the standby screen allows the user to message their friends through Phone Mode.

Users can also access contacts by tapping the search icon at the top of the stanby screen. Some additional Phone Mode interfaces are currently under creative development.

Users can exit Phone Mode at any time to return to their normal devices (and all the complexity they include).

Above: all screens and complete user experience design for Phone Mode, which was initially set to launch on Pixel 4 in 2019.

Phone Mode is still currently under creative development at Google Creative Lab; I also designed a retro-inspired Nokia-like interface for this project.

Notable Women
Google font, brand, website, apps
2017 — 2018

Notable Women is an AR Experiment that lets anyone see 100 historic American women where they’ve historically been left out: U.S. currency. From activists, artists, and scientists to business moguls, writers, and civic leaders, Notable Women uncovers the stories of historic women right on the money in your wallet.

I contributed to the design and development of the Notable Women website and augmented reality apps—building out a sweet of brand assets including hundreds of individually edited U.S. bills with historical women’s faces. I also worked closely with fellow designers Noemie Le Coz and Hana Tanimura to build the Notable Women logo into a full typeface, which is now available on Google fonts.

The Notable Women brand, logo, and typeface all reference U.S. currency; the Notable Women letterforms stem from those that appear on U.S. bills, but are redrawn with their serifs removed. While consistently nodding to its historical origins, Notable Women uses modern graphic form, bold color, and the latest in augmented reality technology to highlight women from U.S. history deserving of a place on our currency.

Notable Women was featured on It’s Nice That and Typewolf, and was the winner of the Site of the Day on FWA. Notable Women also the 2019 Webby People's Voice Winner in Public Service and Activism for "Apps, mobile sites, and progressive web apps that educate and empower citizens, and/or encourage civic engagement within one’s community or society at large." Notable Women was also a 2019 Webby Nominee for Best Use of Augmented Reality. Visit the project site at notablewomen.com or learn more about the project at experiments.withgoogle.com.

Notable Women features a stack of 100 bills that the user swipes through by scrolling the page. Each bill is accompanied by a short biography of the featured American woman.

The bills were edited to remove serial numbers and other federal identifiers for legal purposed. In the place of the removed elements, our team added a custom Notable Women seal, a project hashtag, and other theme text. I produced four bill variants spread among the 100 bills, so that subtle details would change as users explored the website.

Learn more about the featured women and see more assets I designed (including a downloadable project poster and giant bulletin board with all 100 $1 bills) at notablewomen.com. You can also learn more about the project at experiments.withgoogle.com.

Notable Display
Custom font for Notable Women
2018

Designed and drew 250+ glyphs to build out a custom typeface for Google Creative Lab's Notable Women—an educational website and AR app that superimposes the faces of notable women from U.S. history over existing U.S. currency.

This project was completed with oversight and creative direction from Noemie Le Coz and Hana Tanimura.

Notable Display is free, open source, and available to download at fonts.google.com.

Lacquer Display
Google Font, website, posters
2019

Collaborated with friend, co-worker, producer, and photographer Niki Polyocan to draw, digitize, edit, and programmatically kern 396 glyphs for a custom handwritten typeface. I also worked with creative technologists at Google Creative Lab to develop tools for programmatically kerning large numbers of irregular glyphs. Lastly, I build a web type specimen showcasing all of Lacquers glyphs and alternates. Lacquer is currently available on Google Fonts.

This project was completed while working at Google Creative Lab. Lacquer went live on Google Fonts in August 2019. Poster and programmatic specimens by me.

You can visit the Lacquer online type specimen at lacquer.eli-block.com or download Lacquer for free at fonts.google.com.

Posters
Experimental & promotional posters
2019 — 2020

A spark/sketches for a Google Home micro-collection to debut at the Milan Salone Del Mobile 2018.

The collection was intended to expand on the existing functionality and shape language of Google's Home hardware line—taking off-the-shelf technologies from speakers to wifi and remixing it into new, irreverent forms for the Salone.

The poster above showcases Google's existing Home offering, while the poster below envisions how that offering might expand for this one-time exhibition or limited edition collection. The capabilities of each device is listed in the top right. Modern Art Google Home devices might playfully experiment with combining different combinations of technologies into different devices.

The collection model encourages users to see their devices as a family, while simultaneously allowing people with different taste to select their favorite forms.

This spark was pitched internally at Google Creative Lab.

Google Crabfood
Brand & website
2019 — 2020

Crabfood is Google's poor man's Mary Meeker. It provides weekly analysis on emerging tech, startup, and market trends... with sass. I worked with David Benjamin (Crabfood's lead) to refine the Crabfood brand and design a website to serve Crabfood's nearly 2K subscribers—many of whom are Google leadership.

The site homepage features a giant ticker which displays recent insights as well as a Crabfood description. The bottom of the page contains a row of links to recent Crabfood reports.

There were minimal development resources for this project so the design was intended to be a simple skin for Google Drive. Scrolling the homepage reveals a Drive-like archive of all the Crabfood reports, organized by category and recency.

There is currently no way to search for information in Crabfood. Making a simple search interface was apr priority of this website. The site would include multiple ways to filter results. Top results are highlighted in yellow.

In phase II of the build, individual reports will be readable on the site (userswill no longer need to be linked out to Google Docs). The above image shows what reading a report might look like.

The image above (as well as the rest of the images below) are sketches for alternative Crabfood site designs, some of which include a project editor, grid vs. list views, and a Crabfood report release calendar.

Google Crabfood Culture
Bi-weekly insight newsletter
2017 — 2018

A bi-weekly newsletter focusing on cultural trends and happenings across film, TV, music, writing, art, design, and fashion.

I designed and wrote Crabfood Culture in collaborated with Will Bareford, a writer in Google Creative Lab. Crabfood Culture is a bi-weekly newsletter providing analysis on emerging market trends as they relate happenings in tech to the many creative industries: film, TV, music, writing, art, design, and fashion.

Will and I have written 12 issues of Crabfood Culture—although by the time you're reading this, there will likely be more. Old issues can be found here. Newer issues can be found here. You can read one of our latest issues here.

Creative Lab 5
Website for Google Creative Lab 5
2017 — 2018

Over 10 versions of a public-facing website to promote, provide information about, and receive applications for the Google Creative Lab 5 program.

This was the first seriously considered design for the Creative Lab 5 website—which sought to foreground the program's alumni in order to lend credibility to the program overall (which previously had almost no online information). It was eventually decided that featuring alumni would pose a legal challenge, so this design—that allowed searching through people via a colored tagging system—was discarded.

The five alumni on the homepage would randomize on load and cycle in new named periodically using a fade out effect.

Scrolling the full list of alumni. The Creative Lab 5 call to action is always visible, along with a small link to a page about the program.

Clicking apply opens a small application window that still allows the user to maintain their context within the overall site design.

Alternate sketches for how the application could appear.

The project brief stated that the site should be straight-forward and functional. This design plays off the idea of a functionalist archive, where all the essential information is compressed into an understandable one-pager.

An alternate version of the archive design, where all the site content is available on one clearly laid-out page. The "Apply" button in the background is positioned in the absolute center of the site and animates on scroll. The "Apply" button also changes state on hover to indicate that is is clickable.

The site is divided into two primary columns, with ever-present text and links on the left and bonus content (revealed on link hover) on the right. Alerts to application deadlines might also appear in the top right.

Blue links might change to color once hovered or clicked, encouraging visitors to explore the site.

Since the content of the site is primarily text, this version of the site foregrounds the type by simply making it large. A minimal directory at the top of the page helps the user navigate the long scroll.

A sketch for a simple navigation bar interaction that plays off the number 5; there would be five dots on load, that would need to be hovered in order to reveal their destinations.

Hovering project names in the projects section would open a large iFrame where visitors could explore the project sites themselves.

A slightly less bold version of the large-type direction. This design uses an accent color and subtle motion to bring the site to life.

The final design for the Creative Lab 5 website. This design uses large Google Sans and a numbered side navigation that stretches to fill the left side of the page.

The site launched in early March and has already accepted hundreds of applicants for future classes of Creative Lab 5. You can visit the site at CreativeLab5.com.

ADCOLOR + Google Hackathon
Misc. branding and posters
2018

Brand for an inclusivity-themed hackathon sponsored by ADCOLOR & Google Creative Lab.

ADCOLOR is the premier organization that celebrates and advocates diversity in the creative and technology industries. The Hack for Everyone identity thus uses cut-outs and color-pickers as an exuberant, celebratory metaphor for punching through whiteness and creating a more vibrant and diverse future.

F37 Jan was modified into a stencil font for Hack for Everyone so that dual-layer posters with cut-out type could be produced.

A series of posters was also created with expressive digital paintings that could be overlaid with white cut-out typography.

Some typographic details are highlighted below.

Google Campus
Large scale graphics & illustrations
2018 — 2019

20+ mock-ups and partial illustrations for the walls of the Google NYC offices.

This is just one example of the many installation and wall vinyl designs I produced for the Google NYC offices. The design system—a Google Doodle for the sides any corporate office—is intended to extend across Google's many campuses, potentially worldwide.

Hardware Sketches
Misc. sketches & blueprints
2017 — 2018

Hardware sketches & rough blueprints for Google Home accessories and Google Assistant devices.

A cube-shaped projector with the front dimensions of a Google Clips.

A compact home printer that prints from a roll of paper.

A microphone you can use to play games, record your voice, and speak to the Google Assistant.

A mobile Google Assistant device. The small device would connect to a base that could be installed anywhere an Assistant would be useful—like in the car.

Sketches, blueprints, and 3D models were developed for project sparks inside Google Creative Lab.

Test Renders

A sample collection of (rough) test renders used to establish cameras and textures for product renders. These renders were process work and not finished products.

Currently working to dig up some more render process work. In the meantime, there are more 3D projects on my external portfolio website here: Concept UAV, Landscape OS, Fossil Watches, and Rock Ceramics.

Process work
2018 — 2020

All of the work featured here was done in the last 24 months—both inside and outside of Creative Lab and Brand Studio. However, I've also worked on a ton of projects that aren't featured here, like the Experiments Platform Exhibition at Google I/O 2018 and 2019, simple DIY voice-activated machines, Google's messaging strategy, a campaign for Google Assistant, a redesign of Google Shopping, the relaunch of "Our Stories" on About.Google, the Google Company OKR's website, and features for Google Pixel 4.

Soli Objects
Hardware Exploration
2019

Google COVID-19 Site
COVID-19 Information & Resources
2020

Process work
2018 — 2020

Any professional creative knows that compiling your portfolio can be a daunting task—especially when considering yet unlaunched work in the production pipeline and sensitive work that must be protected under non-disclosure agreement. There is also, however, always more work to show that is still in development or not quite finished.

Like other creatives, I have a ton of process work and in-production projects. For this reason, process concepts in this portfolio are called out with tan text and some additional process images are included at the very bottom of this page. That said, I'm happy to share more process work related to any project documented here—just let me know what you're interested in seeing.

Lastly, to distinguish process work images visually from finished work on this site, they are framed and presented in black and white, as below.

Cast resin blocks and cut-offs from the production of Fossil.

Fossil concept sketches, app icons, render views, and hardware collection art direction concept.

Sketches of other Fossil objects—in this case F30 (a solid bar) and F50 (a vessel).

Process shot of the sanded and finished resin block I cast, scanned, retouched, and rendered to produce Fossil F20.

A reconstructed bowl I photographed in Greece. The terrazzo pattern is inspiration for hardware material treatments (from Landscape to Fossil F50).

A film shot I took on Paros in Greece. I often sketch and find inspiration while on vacation with my family.

Concept drawings and render spec for the Fossil doc (for syncing files to and from the Fossil drives).

Another beautiful antique I photographed as inspiration for Fossil F50.

Concept drawing of Fossil F20 on its syncing doc.

Export from Sketch file for the Fossil website. The site features a double infinite scroll where the background (small) type scrolls in an infinite loop in one direction while the foreground (large) type scrolls in an infinite loop in the other direction. 'Fossil by Wild-Type' is static and remains fixed to the center of the browser window.

Color variations (Easter eggs) on the Fossil by Wild-Type site. The site variations use a color system I developed for the product line.

Process shot of the Fossil by Wild-Type poster. I love to play with layering, transparency, multiply effects, hierarchy, and lots of type.

Another color variation for the Fossil by Wild-Type website.

Double exposure photo I shot in Greece last fall.

Double exposure photo I shot on an evening in Santorini.

Sketches for a collection of Fossil file storage objects—ranging from beads (store a single file) to a small monolith (which can store up to 20 files).

The rough resin block I eventually sanded to produce Fossil F20. Since I don't have access to a machine shop since the onset of shelting at home, I rough cut my resin cast using a hack saw.

A noisy gradient from a crop of a film photo I took of a sun umbrella.

Double exposure photo I shot in Santorini, Greece.

One of my favorite creative accidents: glistening water from a double exposure phot of the ocean.

Detail crop of a double exposure photo. I absolutely love the extreme crops that Photoshop makes when exporting images.

Double exposure photo I shot while (1) kayaking and (2) taking the ferry in Paros, Greece.

Design for the Fossil by Wild-Type website. I created this website along with a poster to promote the project (but really just for fun).

Detail crop of the above double exposure image of the ocean.

Small 3D printed prototypes Fossil charm objects than store a single precious file. The charm objects borrow form language from the sculptures of Alma Allen, an American artist and sculptor whose work I really admire.

A page from my sketchbook showing Fossil charm object form explorations.

Original sketches for the first Fossil drive concept.

Cast glass by Thaddeus Wolfe, an American artist whose work I really admire. Thaddeus Wolfe's marbled glass compositions and unique forms are both huge inspirations for me.

Cross section shot of a less successful resin block I cast to use for Fossil.

Another of the 20+ colorways for the Fossil by Wild-Type site.

Process shot of my obsessive retouching of the Fossil resin block I cast. Because I don't have access to a vacuum chamber for removing air bubbles from the resin before it sets I (sneakily) edited out most of the imperfections.

Concepts for Fossil industrial production and custom packaging.

Sketches exploring how the Fossil packaging might be branded. If this looks like Off-White its because I really love Off-White.

More sketches in which I attempt to figure out how the Fossil packaging could work (to be CNC'd out of blue foam and sealed with printed packing tape).

An application sketch for Miu, a san serif typeface developed outside of Google Brand Studio. I've drawn over 250 glyphs for Miu in the last few months.

I have a soft spot for stencil fonts; drawings of additional styles (strait stencil and 'bone' stencil) for Miu.

Some of the many Miu glyphs I drew.

A 30 second rebrand for sustainable clothing company Reformation (using Miu).

Reformation rebrand application sketch using Miu.

Process shot from kerning Miu. While at Google Creative Lab, I developed scripts to optimize kerning based on every possible glyph pairing (something I desperately needed when working on Lacquer).

Even more Miu glyphs.

Reformation rebrand application sketch using Miu.

Packaging concept sketches.

Miu symbols.

Abstract UI composition produced for the Google Design Blog.

Top secret sketches for Google Year in Search.

Small scale models for some custom computer cases I'm working on. These computer cases attempt to make turn the technological objects we use every day into a different kind of abstract home object (more akin to furniture).

Orthographic drawing and color spec sheet for a custom computer case design.

Orthographic drawing and color spec sheet for a custom computer case design.

Double exposure film photo I shot in Ammoudi, Santorini.

All screens and complete user experience design for Phone Mode, in development for Google Pixel.

Screenshot I took while building this site (uploading my work on the Soli objects).

Process shot of the original design for Wild-Type Landscape hardware.

A couple of ecosystem maps I drew for our redesign of Google Trends.

Film I shot near my house in the Presidio and developed at the Harvey Milk Photo Center.

Process screenshot of color selection while working on Wild-Type Color.

Early concept test render for Wild-Type Color creative direction.

Film I shot and developed in San Francisco.

Detail of a double exposure film photo I shot while on vacation last year.

Explanatory data visualization graphics I drew to communicate data strategy for the Google Trends redesign.

Infographic (explaining the functioning of an API) I drew for the Supreme Court case Google vs. Oracle.

Explanatory data visualization graphics I drew to communicate data strategy for the Google Trends redesign.

Crop of Wild-Type Landscape hardware system.

Image I made for the Lacquer font demo site.

Explanatory data visualization graphics I drew to communicate data strategy for the Google Trends redesign.

Example of an insight slide I might present in a data strategy meeting. In this case, I pulled insights related to wellbeing to be used in a Google social campaign.

Google Search data insight slide. I use a combination of Google's public front-end Trends tool and custom internal back-end tools to mine Search data for interesting trends.

Google Search data insight slide.

Google Search data insight slide.

Double exposure film photo I took with an underwater camera.

Detail crop of a double exposure film photo I took of the sunset.

Google Search data insight slide.

Google Search data insight slide. Insights I worked on related to racial justice and inclusive Pride launched in a series of projects (Google's racial justice search trends film to the forthcoming Pride film to posts on Google social channels).

Google Search data insight slide.

Google Search data insight slide. The high volume of Black trans search interest ultimately lead our team to produce a film highlighting Black trans activism.

Search interested related to Marsha P. Johnson resulted in the Google Doodle on June 30th.

Noisy detail crop of a double exposure film photo.

Google Search data insight slide.

Black and white film photo I shot and developed in San Francisco.

Film photo detail crop.

Double exposure film photo detail crop.

One of my favorite photos; sunset near our house on Paros.

Well, you made it all the way to the end! Thank you so much for checking out my work—it means something that you made it this far.

If you have any questions, comments, or if you would like to see more of anything in particular, then please don't hesitate to contact me at: eliblock@google.com or eli.block@me.com.

Top